The CDC has announced new mask protocols for vaccinated individuals, however as the announcement does not apply to hospitals or medical facilities, there will be no changes for our office protocols for patients, guests, and staff members. Masks are still a requirement for all patients, guests and staff at our offices.

To ensure your health and safety we will continue to implement the following:

  • Confidential virtual consultations (telemedicine) with all doctors using Klara to allow patients to continue their care with the physicians they know and trust while staying safe in the comfort of their own home. Please text 718-550-5971 to sign up. Please note that patients should not send photos or other clinically relevant information until they have agreed to move forward with their appointment using Klara.
  • Online skincare product orders please send a request HERE.
  • Bookings for in-person appointments 

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out. We are here for you!

Sincerely,
Dermatology & Surgery Associates

Granuloma

Granuloma is a generic term that refers to a small nodule. It can be any type of nodule, from benign to malignant. Granulomas occur throughout the body. Two types of granuloma apply expressly to the skin:

Pyogenic Granuloma. Pyogenic granuloma looks like small, reddish bumps on the skin that tend to bleed. It is caused by an injury to the skin. It is most frequently found on the hands, arms and face. In some cases, the nodule will spontaneously disappear. More often, the lesions need to be removed by surgery. There may be some scarring as a result of these treatments.

Granuloma Annulare. This type of nodule can occur in any person, but is more common in children and young adults. It is characterized by a ring-shaped lesion that is round and firm; red, white or purple skin around a clear crater of normal skin. It can appear individually or in groups. Most often, it appears on tops of hands and feet, elbows and knees. Most people have no other symptoms, but some may experience itchiness at the site of the lesion. Granuloma annulare can resolve itself and may or may not disappear over time without treatment. However, if the incidence is widespread or aesthetically undesirable, a dermatologist may prescribe a steroid cream or inject steroids just below the skin's surface to speed healing. Another successful treatment is PUVA, in which a medication called psoralen is given and then the area is exposed to ultraviolet light.

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