To Our Valued Patients:

The world is grappling with an issue of enormous scale and human impact. Our hearts go out to all who have been affected by the outbreak of Coronavirus (COVID-19).

At this time, we would like to inform you that we are still open for regular business hours. 

In addition, to ensure your health and safety we have implemented the following: 

  • Confidential virtual consultations (telemedicine) with all doctors using Klara to allow patients to continue their care with the physicians they know and trust while staying safe in the comfort of their own home. Please text 718-550-5971 to sign up. Please note that patients should not send photos or other clinically relevant information until they have agreed to move forward with their appointment using Klara. 
  • Online skincare product orders please send a request HERE.
  • Bookings for in-person appointments 

At Dermatology and Surgery Associates, we believe it is our role and responsibility during this time to prioritize the health and well-being of our patients and employees while also playing a constructive role in supporting local health officials and government leaders as they work to contain the virus.

As part of these efforts, we promote and encourage precautions to reduce the spread of airborne and bacterial illnesses at our office by following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and CDC Guidelines every day. We urge everyone to follow all recommended guidelines and practice social isolation to improve the present situation.

As precautionary measures to protect and provide a safe treatment environment for our patients and team members, we are adding supplementary procedures across our organization, which include the following:

  • Wiping down all waiting and treatment rooms with disinfectants every hour
  • We are instructing patients when scheduling appointments to call ahead and discuss the need to reschedule their appointment if they develop symptoms of a respiratory infection (e.g., cough, sore throat, fever) within 72 hours of the day they are scheduled to be seen. This will also be asked during appointment reminder calls with patients.

We hope this alleviates some of your fears and concerns during this time. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out. We are here for you!


Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is a bacterial infection transmitted by ticks. It is relatively rare, but can cause serious damage to the heart, lungs and brain. The difficulty lies in diagnosis because many people are unaware that they've been bitten by a tick. Three types of ticks transmit the Rickettsia rickettsii bacteria:

  • Dog ticks, usually in the Eastern part of the country,
  • Wood ticks, usually in the Rocky Mountain states, and
  • Lone star ticks, usually on the West coast.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is characterized by a rash that begins as small red spots or blotches on the wrists, ankles, palms or soles of the feet. It spreads up the arms and legs to the trunk of the body. These symptoms take between one and two weeks to appear following a tick bite. The rash is often accompanied by fever, chills, muscle ache, red eyes, light sensitivity, excessive thirst, loss of appetite, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and/or fatigue. While there are lab tests your doctor can use to diagnose the disease, they take time to complete, so you may be placed on a course of antibiotic treatment right away.

The best way to prevent Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is to avoid tick-infested areas. If you spend any time in areas with woods, tall grasses or shrubs, wear long sleeves and pants. Tuck pants legs into socks. Wear closed shoes, not sandals. Do a visual check of each member of your family upon returning home. And don't forget to check your dog for ticks (if applicable).

If you do find a tick, don't panic. Use tweezers to disengage the tick from the skin. Grab the tick by the head or mouthparts as close as possible to where the bite has entered the skin. Pull firmly and steadily away from the skin until the tick disengages. Clean the bite wound with disinfectant and monitor the bite mark for other symptoms. You can place the tick in a jar or plastic bag and take it to your dermatologist for examination. Because less than one percent of tick bites transmit this bacteria, antibiotics are not generally prescribed unless there are other symptoms present.

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