To Our Valued Patients:

The world is grappling with an issue of enormous scale and human impact. Our hearts go out to all who have been affected by the outbreak of Coronavirus (COVID-19).

At this time, we would like to inform you that we are still open for regular business hours. 

In addition, to ensure your health and safety we have implemented the following: 

  • Confidential virtual consultations (telemedicine) with all doctors using Klara to allow patients to continue their care with the physicians they know and trust while staying safe in the comfort of their own home. Please text 718-550-5971 to sign up. Please note that patients should not send photos or other clinically relevant information until they have agreed to move forward with their appointment using Klara. 
  • Online skincare product orders please send a request HERE.
  • Bookings for in-person appointments 

At Dermatology and Surgery Associates, we believe it is our role and responsibility during this time to prioritize the health and well-being of our patients and employees while also playing a constructive role in supporting local health officials and government leaders as they work to contain the virus.

As part of these efforts, we promote and encourage precautions to reduce the spread of airborne and bacterial illnesses at our office by following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and CDC Guidelines every day. We urge everyone to follow all recommended guidelines and practice social isolation to improve the present situation.

As precautionary measures to protect and provide a safe treatment environment for our patients and team members, we are adding supplementary procedures across our organization, which include the following:

  • Wiping down all waiting and treatment rooms with disinfectants every hour
  • We are instructing patients when scheduling appointments to call ahead and discuss the need to reschedule their appointment if they develop symptoms of a respiratory infection (e.g., cough, sore throat, fever) within 72 hours of the day they are scheduled to be seen. This will also be asked during appointment reminder calls with patients.

We hope this alleviates some of your fears and concerns during this time. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out. We are here for you!


Boils

Also known as skin abscesses, boils form as a result of a cut or break in the skin, which leads to a bacterial infection. They are characterized as a red, tender area with a painful, pus-filled center that can open spontaneously or by surgical incision. Some boils are caused by an ingrown hair. Others are caused by plugged-up sweat glands, such as some types of cystic acne. Anyone can get a boil. They grow quickly and are usually painful until they drain. However, left alone a boil will naturally come to a head and burst open, allowing the pus to drain and the skin to heal. People with weakened immune systems are more susceptible to boils than the general population.

Boils tend to occur on parts of the body that have hair or sweat glands and are exposed to friction, typically on the face, neck, armpits or buttocks. There are a variety of different types of boils:

Furuncle or Carbuncle. These abscesses are caused by the Staphylococcus aureus bacterium. A furuncle is an individual boil; carbuncles are deep clusters of boils that most often form on the back of the neck, shoulders or thighs.

Pilonidal Cyst. An infected hair follicle around the buttocks area caused by long periods of sitting. Pilonidal cysts almost always require medical treatment.

Hidredenitis Suppurativa. These are multiple abscesses that form from blocked sweat glands in the armpits or groin areas.

Cystic Acne. These boils are situated more deeply into skin tissue than the more superficial forms of acne. It typically occurs among teenagers.

Boils respond well to home remedies. To promote healing, apply heat to the boil in the form of hot soaks or compresses. Keep the area clean, apply over-the-counter antibiotics and then cover with gauze. Do not puncture or squeeze the boil because it can lead to further infection. If the boil does not go away within two weeks, is accompanied by a fever or is painful, contact your dermatologist. The doctor will clean, lance and drain the boil and prescribe an antibiotic to alleviate the infection.

Our Location

Find us on the map